Are you always reminding a child to use a ‘finger space’ when writing? Use a visual support! (free resource)

Remembering to leave a space between words when writing can sometimes be tricky for children to remember.

 

A visual support can often help to remind a child to leave a space between words, if it is in the eye view such as on their table. A visual support will also encourage a child to leave a space by themselves rather than becoming reliant on an adult telling them to leave a space.

 

I like using ‘finger space’ visual supports that are shaped like a finger. As well as acting as a visual reminder, the child can also place it on their work and use it as a physical measurement, so placing it after a word and then starting the next word after the finger.

 

finger space visual support asdteacher.com

 

Click here to download a free visual finger space resource. Simply print, cut out and ensure the child knows what it means by showing them how to use it. Make sure the visual support is in the child’s eye view when writing and encourage independency by enabling the child/children to get it themselves.

 

Another more individual ‘finger space’ visual support idea is to use a photo or photocopy of the child’s hand. This will give the child ownership of the visual resource as it is their own hand!

 

finger space visual support asdteacher.com

 

Teaching Resource Tuesday

The importance of making the use of objects clear for children with autism

It can sometimes be easy to overlook that not every child knows what to do with certain objects.

Children with autism find generalising learning difficult and therefore if they learn how to do something in one context, this does not necessarily mean they will know how to or have the desire to do it in a different context. For example, a child may learn to place blocks on top of each other with their Dad at home but will not necessarily know how to build in a different context, for example with Lego at school.

For this reason, it is important to ensure that children know what to do with objects before expecting them to use them in the way intended.

It is important to remember to:

  • Always model first (e.g. show the child how to do it e.g. cutting out a desired shape with scissors in front of them so they can see)
  • Use visuals to break down the steps in the activity and make this clear (e.g. visual instructions of what to do with the Duplo blocks)

clear visual instructions asdteacher

 

  • Use visuals to show the desired result of the objects

desired end result visual asdteacher

 

desired-end-result-visual-asdteacher-2

 

Remember, make it clear to the child what it is you are expecting them to do!

 

Teaching Resource Tuesday

 

Every child loves songs! Here is a free interactive song choice board

Here is a free interactive choice board that links straight to songs on YouTube. The songs are some favourites of primary aged children I have taught. These interactive choice boards are very easy to make in a program such as PowerPoint by creating ‘hyperlinks’ to a web page.

Interactive singing choice board

A child can choose a song by clicking on the picture. This can be great in a class or group setting on an interactive whiteboard or at home on a computer or laptop.

Click here to download the interactive song choice board!

Teaching Resource Tuesday