Are you always reminding a child to use a ‘finger space’ when writing? Use a visual support! (free resource)

Remembering to leave a space between words when writing can sometimes be tricky for children to remember.

 

A visual support can often help to remind a child to leave a space between words, if it is in the eye view such as on their table. A visual support will also encourage a child to leave a space by themselves rather than becoming reliant on an adult telling them to leave a space.

 

I like using ‘finger space’ visual supports that are shaped like a finger. As well as acting as a visual reminder, the child can also place it on their work and use it as a physical measurement, so placing it after a word and then starting the next word after the finger.

 

finger space visual support asdteacher.com

 

Click here to download a free visual finger space resource. Simply print, cut out and ensure the child knows what it means by showing them how to use it. Make sure the visual support is in the child’s eye view when writing and encourage independency by enabling the child/children to get it themselves.

 

Another more individual ‘finger space’ visual support idea is to use a photo or photocopy of the child’s hand. This will give the child ownership of the visual resource as it is their own hand!

 

finger space visual support asdteacher.com

 

Teaching Resource Tuesday

Taking turns visual resource: make sure the children know whose turn it is!

Children with autism can find it difficult to predict what will or could happen next. It can therefore be challenging to understand who will be chosen to have a turn during a group or class activity. This can lead to anxious or ‘disruptive’ behaviour such as calling out, crying and shouting, because the child does not know who’s turn it is and most likely wants to have a turn themselves!

This can be easily avoided by using a visual resource to show the child exactly who’s turn it is, even before the activity has begun. This will therefore immediately decrease any anxiety or confusion about whose turn it is because the child/ children can clearly see.

Here are a few examples:

  • Photo board showing whose turn it is on what day.
  • A spinning dial with everyone’s photo and an arrow which can be spun randomly to point to whose turn it is.
  • A board with Velcro so that a photo can be placed on to show whose turn it is.

turn taking asdteacher

Make sure the resource is clear so the child/children know exactly whose turn it is!

Teaching Resource Tuesday

Visual register board for children with autism

This is the register board I use with my class of children with autism at the beginning and the end of every day. First thing in the morning, the class sit as a group in a semi circle and sing a ‘good morning’ song to each child (the same song every day to keep the routine familiar). After singing to each child, the child walks to the register board and moves their photo or name from the home section to the school section. Once we have sung to every child who is in school, I then choose a child to count “how many children?”. The child counts how many children (with or without support) and chooses the amount from a number board which I then show to each child and it is put below the school section as seen in the photo.

registration board

At the end of the day, we sing a ‘time to go home’ song and then each child takes it in turn to move their name or photo from the school section to the home section. This enables the children to know that it is now time to go home. This is a good familiar routine for the children which can be easily learnt and also a great visual for everyone to see who is in school that day.

First post!

Hello and welcome to asdteacher.com

This is my first post and it will hopefully be the first of many!

My name is Steph and I teach in a primary special school for children with autistic spectrum disorder and severe learning difficulties in the East London borough of Hackney.

I studied Early Childhood Studies combined with Special Needs and Inclusion Studies for my undergraduate degree followed by a Post Graduate Certificate of Education specialising in the teaching of Early Years.

I have worked with some amazing children over recent years who have inspired me to learn as much as possible about how to positively teach and support children with a ASD.

I have started this blog in order to contain all the information and resources I find valuable and interesting in one place. Knowing how useful and important this information is for me and teaching, it is likely that other education professionals, parents or anyone supporting children with ASD will also find this useful. I also wanted somewhere to express my thoughts and opinions and to share them with you so we can learn from each other.

Please leave a comment or you can contact me through twitter via @asd_teacher